The Power of Positive Thinking

We expect too much of the dishonest, the unreliable and the lazy. They have their hands full accusing others of being dishonest, unreliable and lazy.

If the “is” is intolerable, you’re left with the “is not.”

With science we scaffold a hollow building.

The role of imagination in sensation is underestimated. The highly sensitive add to sensation imagination, and thus they—seeing both present and not present—see more.

Cf., Ian Craib, The Importance of Disappointment: “[T]hinking involves a realisation that there are things in other people that I am blind to and things that are not there, but which I see too easily.”

We Americans believe in positive thinking, and can be quite negative about people who are not openly positive, and quite afraid of not being sufficiently and demonstrably positive ourselves. It takes all our remaining energy to turn on the TV.

A young woman who, thanks to her youth or beauty or to a certain admiring softness, receives preferential treatment from an older man will be doubly pleased if she is not made aware of why she is receiving this special treatment.

 

Credit and Links

Image is of cat mummies, reportedly from the British Museum’s collection of animal mummies. For more about Egyptian animal mummies click.

Ian Craib, The Importance of Disappointment.

For more Montaigbakhtinian one-liners click.



Categories: American culture, Denial the American Way, Etiquette, The Real World

Tags: , , , ,

2 replies

  1. i love the message of this piece,

    the nature of positive thinking is good, but only if there is positives

    otherwise….the person should examine it realistically

    we place too much emphasis on being positive

    but really the message of the insistent positive nature is

    “why aren’t you blind like we are”

  2. I love your subtlety and gentle cynicism, if that’s what it is. It looks like I might applaud an awful lot of your points you write. This is lovely and true.

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